EDEN IAS

NEWS IMPULSE – 14 MILLION TONNES OF MICROPLASTICS ON SEA FLOOR : STUDY| 08 OCTOBER

<p style=”margin-bottom: 8px; text-align: center;”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”line-height:107%”><span style=”font-family:Calibri,sans-serif”><span style=”color:#595959″><b><span style=”color:black”>SOURCE &ndash; THE HINDU</span></b></span></span></span></span></p>

<p style=”margin-bottom: 8px; text-align: center;”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”line-height:107%”><span style=”font-family:Calibri,sans-serif”><span style=”color:#595959″><b><span style=”color:black”>GS PAPER &ndash; 1&amp; 3</span></b></span></span></span></span></p>

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<p style=”margin-bottom:8px”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”line-height:107%”><span style=”font-family:Calibri,sans-serif”><span style=”color:#595959″><b><span style=”color:black”>CONTEXT – </span></b><b><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:107%”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;”><span style=”color:black”>Researchers at the agency, known as CSIRO, used a robotic submarine to collect samples from sites up to 3,000 metres deep, off the South Australian coast</span></span></span></span></b></span></span></span></span></p>

<p style=”margin-bottom:8px”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”line-height:107%”><span style=”font-family:Calibri,sans-serif”><span style=”color:#595959″><b><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:107%”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,&quot;sans-serif&quot;”><span style=”color:black”>Highlights</span></span></span></span></b></span></span></span></span></p>

<ul>
<li style=”margin-left:8px”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”color:#282828″>The world&#39;s sea floor is littered with an estimated 14 million tonnes of microplastics, broken down from the masses of rubbish entering the oceans every year, according to Australia&#39;s national science agency.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li>
<li style=”margin-left:8px”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”color:#282828″>The quantity of the tiny pollutants was 25 times greater than previous localised studies had shown, the agency said, calling it the first global estimate of sea-floor microplastics.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li>
<li style=”margin-left:8px”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”color:#282828″>Researchers at the agency, known as CSIRO, used a robotic submarine to collect samples from sites up to 3,000 metres deep, off the South Australian coast</span></span></span></span></span></span></li>
<li style=”margin-left:8px”><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”color:#282828″>The scientists, who published their findings in peer-reviewed journal&nbsp;<em style=”color:#262626; font-weight:bold; font-style:normal”><span style=”color:#282828″>Frontiers in Marine Science</span></em>, said areas with more floating rubbish generally had more microplastic fragments on the sea floor</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li>
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<p><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><b><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”color:#282828″>What is Microplastic ?</span></span></span></b></span></span></span></span></p>

<p><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”color:#282828″>Plastic pollution that ends up in the ocean deteriorates and breaks down, ending up as microplastics,The results show microplastics are indeed sinking to the ocean floor.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p>

<p><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><b><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”color:#282828″>Conclusion </span></span></b></span></span></span></span></p>

<p><span style=”font-size:14px;”><span style=”background:white”><span style=”line-height:19.5pt”><span style=”font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif”><span lang=”EN-GB”><span style=”color:#282828″>Government, industry and the community need to work together to significantly reduce the amount of litter we see along our beaches and in our oceans</span></span></span></span></span></span></p>

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